• Discover Original Art to Inspire the Season Ahead

  • 20% Off Originals of €5,000+

  • free transfer in Euroup

Story : Anthony van Dyck Flemish

Storyteller : Museum

Date : 2021/12/21

check Endless art in our world

check Stories that happen every day

check Share your experiences with others

  • Anthony van Dyck Flemish
  • 2
  • 3
  • Anthony van Dyck Flemish
  • 2
  • 3

Details & Dimensions

Review some exhibition on past

Saint Rosalie Interceding for the Plague-stricken of Palermo
1624
Anthony van Dyck Flemish



Van Dyck was in Palermo, Sicily, when a plague broke out and the city was quarantined. In their despair, residents prayed to the city’s patroness, Saint Rosalie, whose long-lost remains (she died about 1160) were rediscovered in the midst of the epidemic. Images of Saint Rosalie were in great demand; this one was painted by Van Dyck on top of a striking self-portrait that he had sketched on the canvas. Acquired in 1871, this was one of the first significant European paintings to enter The Met’s collection.

Object Details

Title: Portrait Study

Artist: Anthony van Dyck (Flemish, Antwerp 1599–1641 London)

Former Attribution: Sir Peter Lely (Pieter van der Faes) (British, Soest 1618–1680 London)

Date: 1635–41

Medium: Black chalk

Dimensions: sheet: 9 7/8 x 8 3/16 in. (25.1 x 20.8 cm)

Classification: Drawings

Credit Line: Rogers Fund, 1926

Accession Number: 26.169.4

Signatures, Inscriptions, and Markings

Inscription: Annotated in graphite at lower right of mount: "A 4473"
Annotated in graphite at top center of verso of mount: "School Van Dyck"

Exhibition History

New York. Frick Collection. "Van Dyck: The Anatomy of Portraiture," March 2–June 5, 2016.

Sir Peter Paul Rubens (1577–1640)

Copy after Anthony van Dyck Flemish

 Not on view







 Public Domain



Object Details

Title: Sir Peter Paul Rubens (1577–1640)

Artist: Copy after Anthony van Dyck (Flemish, 17th century)

Medium: Oil on wood

Dimensions: 10 x 7 5/8 in. (25.4 x 19.4 cm)

Classification: Paintings

Credit Line: Bequest of Bertha H. Buswell, 1941

Accession Number: 42.23.1

Provenance

Joseph John Martin, Ham Court, Upton-on-Severn, Worcestershire (by 1854–d. 1873); George Edward Martin, Ham Court (1873–d.1905); Eliot George Bromley Martin, Ham Court (1905–24; sale, Christie's, London, March 28, 1924, no. 155, for £325.10 to Buttery); [Horace Buttery, London, from 1924]; [Kleinberger, Paris and New York, until 1927, sold for $5,500 to Aldred]; John Edward Aldred, Lattingtown, N.Y. (1927–40; his sale, Parke-Bernet, New York, December 6, 1940, no. 14, for $2,100); Bertha H. (Mrs. Henry C.) Buswell, Buffalo, N.Y. (1940–41)

Exhibition History

London. Grosvenor Gallery. "Exhibition of the Works of Sir Anthony van Dyck," Summer 1887, no. 146 (lent by G. E. Martin, Esq.).

London. New Gallery. "Exhibition of Pictures by Masters of the Flemish and British Schools," 1899–1900, no. 103 (lent by G. E. Martin).

Detroit Institute of Arts. "Eighth Loan Exhibition of Old Masters, Paintings by Anthony van Dyck," April 3–20, 1929, no. 5 (lent by John E. Aldred, New York).

References

[Gustav Friedrich] Waagen. Treasures of Art in Great Britain. London, 1854, vol. 3, p. 225, as a portrait of Rubens by Van Dyck, at Ham Court.

Handbook for Travellers in Worcestershire and Herefordshire. 4th ed. London, 1894, p. 61.

Ella S. Siple. "Recent Acquisitions by American Collectors." Burlington Magazine 51 (December 1927), p. 303, as by Van Dyck.

Wilhelm R. Valentiner. A Loan Exhibition of Fifty Paintings by Van Dyck. Exh. cat., Detroit Institute of Arts. Detroit, 1929, unpaginated, no. 5, ill., tentatively dates it 1617 based on Rubens's appearance, but notes, however, that the technique suggests Van Dyck's second Antwerp period.

Wilhelm R. Valentiner. "Die Van Dyck-Ausstellung in Detroit." Zeitschrift für bildende Kunst 63 (1929–30), pp. 106, 108, ill., dates it to the second Antwerp period and proposes that Van Dyck gave Rubens a more youthful appearance than he had at the time.

Gustav Glück. Van Dyck, des Meisters Gemälde. 2nd ed. [1st ed. 1909]. Stuttgart, 1931, p. 517, ill. p. XV, dates it shortly after Van Dyck's return from Italy, and calls the oil sketch in the Buccleuch collection a "lesser example".

Hans Gerhard Evers. Rubens und sein Werk: Neue Forschungen. Brussels, 1943, p. 332, as one of the versions relating to Pontius's engraving.

Josephine L. Allen and Elizabeth E. Gardner. A Concise Catalogue of the European Paintings in The Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York, 1954, p. 32.

Erik Larsen. L'opera completa di Van Dyck. Milan, 1980, vol. 2, p. 89, no. 541, ill., as by Van Dyck.

Walter A. Liedtke. Flemish Paintings in The Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York, 1984, vol. 1, pp. 91–94; vol. 2, pl. 38, as a copy after Van Dyck.

Walter A. Liedtke. "Anthony van Dyck." Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin 42 (Winter 1984/85), pp. 35–36, fig. 35.

Erik Larsen. The Paintings of Anthony van Dyck. Freren, Germany, 1988, vol. 2, p. 247, no. 608, ill., as by Van Dyck.

Katharine Baetjer. European Paintings in The Metropolitan Museum of Art by Artists Born Before 1865: A Summary Catalogue. New York, 1995, p. 289, ill.

Notes

The "Iconography," a series of engraved portraits of famous men and women, was planned and largely designed by Van Dyck during the 1630s. The present portrait is connected with that project. The original version of this portrait probably derives in a very free manner from a self-portrait by Rubens dating from the late 1620s or early 1630s. The MMA picture is evidently a copy of an oil sketch in the collection of the Duke of Buccleuch and Queensberry at Boughton House. The authorship of oil sketches connected with the "Iconography" has been a matter of debate. Almost all of the forty-one sketches at Boughton, however, appear to be by Van Dyck himself, including the original of this portrait of Rubens, and a second, slightly different oil sketch of Rubens in the same collection.

Pontius's engraving in the "Iconography" (see M. Mauquoy-Hendrickx, L'Iconographie d'Antoine van Dyck, Catalogue Raisonné, Brussels, 1956, pp. 223–24, no. 62, ill.) reverses the direction of the first oil sketch at Boughton and the Museum's version of it, and differs from them in some details; the second oil sketch at Boughton corresponds in the direction with the engraving and appears to be a revision of the first.

Virgin and Childca. 1620

Anthony van Dyck Flemish

 Not on view


At least eight versions of this tender image came out of Van Dyck’s workshop, and this one is at once the finest and least finished example. The deftly fluid brushstrokes loosely follow an incised underdrawing, which must have been traced from a preparatory drawing. Van Dyck would have kept this panel in his studio as a model for more finished paintings by himself and by assistants.





 Public Domain



Object Details

Title: Virgin and Child

Artist: Anthony van Dyck (Flemish, Antwerp 1599–1641 London)

Date: ca. 1620

Medium: Oil on wood

Dimensions: 25 1/4 x 19 1/2 in. (64.1 x 49.5 cm)

Classification: Paintings

Credit Line: Fletcher Fund, 1951

Accession Number: 51.33.1

Provenance

Leicester Fitzgerald Charles Stanhope, 5th Earl of Harrington, Harrington House, Charing Cross, London (by 1857–d. 1862); the Earls of Harrington, Harrington House (1862–1917); Dudley Henry Eden Stanhope, 9th Earl of Harrington, Harrington House (1917; sale, Christie's, London, May 18, 1917, no. 54, as "The Madonna," for £348 to Williams); Henry Goldman, New York (by 1922–d. 1937; cat., 1922, no. 12); Mrs. Henry Goldman, New York (1937–48); [Wildenstein, New York, 1948–51; sold to MMA]

Exhibition History

New York. World's Fair. "Masterpieces of Art: European Paintings and Sculpture from 1300–1800," May–October 1939, no. 100 (lent by Mrs. Henry Goldman, New York).

New York. Wildenstein. "The Italian Heritage," May 17–August 29, 1967, no. 60.

Indianapolis Museum of Art. "Treasures from the Metropolitan," October 25, 1970–January 3, 1971, no. 66.

References

[Gustav Friedrich] Waagen. Galleries and Cabinets of Art in Great Britain. London, 1857, p. 238, as in the Earl of Harrington's collection.

Frank Jewett Mather, Jr. "A Madonna by Van Dyck." Art in America 7 (April 1919), pp. 103–4, ill. opp. p. 103, notes the indented underdrawing and the influence of Titian, and suggests that the models were Isabella Brant and her son Nicholas; dates it 1621, and records the traditional view that it was acquired directly from Van Dyck by the Harrington family.

Wilhelm R. Valentiner. The Henry Goldman Collection. New York, 1922, unpaginated, no. 12, ill., dates it to Van Dyck's Italian period or shortly thereafter.

Wilhelm R. Valentiner. "Die Sammlung Henry Goldman in New York." Kunst und Künstler 21 (1923), p. 187, ill. p. 188.

Adolf Feulner. Katalog der Gemälde im Residenzmuseum München und in Schloss Nymphenburg. Munich, 1924, p. 28, under no. 99, erroneously as in Boston; describes the Munich picture as a workshop replica of the MMA panel, then in the Goldman collection.

Georg Gronau. "Die Sammlung Henry Goldman." Kunstwanderer 5 (August 1924), p. 345, as from the Italian period.

W. R. Valentiner. "The Henry Goldman Collection." Art News 25 (May 14, 1927), pp. 14–16, ill.

Gustav Glück. Van Dyck, des Meisters Gemälde. 2nd ed. [1st ed. 1909]. Stuttgart, 1931, pp. XXXVI, 536, ill. p. 149, as from the Italian period.

K[urt]. Zoege von Manteuffel in Gustav Glück. Rubens, Van Dyck und ihr Kreis. Vienna, 1933, p. 404 n. to p. 218.

Comte d'Arschot. "Tableaux peu connus conservés en Brabant IV." Revue belge d'archéologie et d'histoire de l'art 16, nos. 3/4 (1946), pp. 130–31, as the original version, of about 1629.

Theodore Rousseau Jr. "Paintings: Purchases." Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin 11 (Summer 1952), p. 32.

Josephine L. Allen and Elizabeth E. Gardner. A Concise Catalogue of the European Paintings in The Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York, 1954, p. 32.

100 Opere di Van Dyck. Exh. cat., Palazzo dell'Accademia. Genoa, 1955, p. 33, under no. 60.

Horst Vey. Die Zeichnungen Anton van Dycks. Brussels, 1962, text vol., p. 183, under no. 113, as from the Italian period.

The Bob Jones University Collection of Religious Paintings. Greenville, S.C., 1962, vol. 2, p. 292, under no. 170, as a replica of the Greenville picture.

Guy-Philippe de Montebello. "Van Dyck, Painter of the Counter Reformation." Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin 22 (December 1963), pp. 133, 135, 137–38, 140, 142, figs. 3–4 (details) and frontispiece, dates it about 1621.

A[ntoine]. de Schryver and C[arl]. van de Velde. Catalogus van de Schilderijen. Ghent, 1972, p. 76, under no. 36.

Erik Larsen. L'opera completa di Van Dyck. Milan, 1980, vol. 1, pp. 111–12, no. 373, ill., switches the illustration of the MMA panel with that of the version in the Bob Jones University collection (no. 374); dates it about 1621–25.

Walter A. Liedtke. Flemish Paintings in The Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York, 1984, vol. 1, pp. 74–77; vol. 2, pl. 31, suggests that it may have been intended as a modello for a more finished and probably larger painting, and observes that it is generally assigned to Van Dyck's Italian years; discusses the relationship of the various versions of this composition.

Walter A. Liedtke. "Anthony van Dyck." Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin 42 (Winter 1984/85), pp. 26–27, 32, fig. 26 (color).

Walter A. Liedtke. "Flemish Paintings in the Metropolitan Museum—II: Van Dyck, Jordaens, Brouwer, and Others." Tableau 6 (February 15, 1984), pp. 30–31, 33 n. 15.

Erik Larsen. The Paintings of Anthony van Dyck. Freren, Germany, 1988, vol. 1, pp. 227, 396 n. 315, fig. 182; vol. 2, p. 178, no. 442.

Alfred Moir. Anthony van Dyck. New York, 1994, pp. 20, 82–83, 90, fig. 29 and colorpl. 18 (detail).

Katharine Baetjer. European Paintings in The Metropolitan Museum of Art by Artists Born Before 1865: A Summary Catalogue. New York, 1995, p. 286, ill.

Robin Blake. Anthony van Dyck: A Life, 1599–1641. London, 1999, pp. 23–24, 368 n. 1, pl. 3, as tentatively dated 1624.

Master Paintings & Sculpture: Day Sale. Sotheby's, New York. January 26, 2017, p. 66, under no. 144.

Notes

This panel is generally assigned to Van Dyck's Italian years. Placing it in the artist's oeuvre is complicated by its seemingly unfinished state, and by the existence of several versions. Ludwig Burchard, in a letter of 1954 (copy in Rubenianum, Antwerp), thought none of the surviving versions autograph. The versions in Turin, Ghent, and Greenville, South Carolina are very probably copies; the one in Munich (Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen) is more impressive, but was catalogued in 1924 as a copy of the Museum's picture. See Liedtke 1984 for a discussion of the painting's technique.

Engraved by Lorenzi (see John Smith, A Catalogue Raisonné of the Works of the Most Eminent Dutch, Flemish, and French Painters . . . , vol. 3, London, 1831, no. 429).
Portrait of a Woman, Called the Marchesa Durazzoprobably ca. 1622–25

Anthony van Dyck Flemish

 Not on view

During the six years he spent in Italy (1621–27), Van Dyck was frequently in Genoa, where he painted some of his most magnificent portraits. This sitter is traditionally identified as a member of the patrician Durazzo family. Whereas many of his portraits recall those of his older colleague Rubens, who had also painted in Genoa, this one testifies to Van Dyck’s admiration of the work of the great Venetian painter Titian (ca. 1485/90?–1576). The portrait has suffered from abrasion and relining, flattening its painterly effects.

Object Details

Title: Portrait of a Woman, Called the Marchesa Durazzo

Artist: Anthony van Dyck (Flemish, Antwerp 1599–1641 London)

Date: probably ca. 1622–25

Medium: Oil on canvas

Dimensions: 44 5/8 x 37 3/4 in. (113.3 x 95.9 cm)

Classification: Paintings

Credit Line: Bequest of Benjamin Altman, 1913

Accession Number: 14.40.615

Provenance

?marchese Gropallo, Genoa; Rodolphe Kann, Paris (by 1900–d. 1905; his estate, 1905–7; cat., 1907, vol. 1, no. 9; sold to Duveen); [Duveen, Paris and New York, 1907–8; sold for $114,445 to Altman]; Benjamin Altman, New York (1908–d. 1913)

Exhibition History

THIS WORK MAY NOT BE LENT, BY TERMS OF ITS ACQUISITION BY THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART.

References

Wilhelm [von] Bode. Gemäldesammlung des Herrn Rudolf Kann in Paris. Vienna, 1900, p. V, pl. 67, gives provenance as collection of the marchese Gropallo, Genoa.

Gustav Glück. "Die Gemäldesammlung des Herrn Rudolf Kann in Paris." Die Graphischen Künste 23 (1900), p. 92.

Wilhelm [von] Bode. Gemälde-Sammlung des Herrn Rudolf Kann in Paris. Vienna, 1900, p. XXIII.

E[mile]. Michel. "La Galerie de M. Rodolphe Kann (2e article)." Gazette des beaux-arts, 3rd ser., 25 (June 1901), p. 502, as painted in Genoa.

Auguste Marguillier. "La collection de M. Rodolphe Kann." Les arts 2 (January 1903), p. 7, ill. p. 8.

Catalogue of the Rodolphe Kann Collection: Pictures. Paris, 1907, vol. 1, no. 9, ill.

Marcel Nicolle. "La Collection Rodolphe Kann." Revue de l'art ancien et moderne 23 (January–June 1908), p. 201.

Connoisseur 20 (January–April 1908), ill. p. 218.

Emil Schaeffer. Van Dyck, des Meisters Gemälde. 1st ed. Stuttgart, 1909, ill. p. 181 [2nd ed. by Gustav Glück, 1931, p. 541, ill. p. 208].

Wilhelm R. Valentiner. "Frühwerke des Anton van Dyck in Amerika." Zeitschrift für bildende Kunst, n.s., 21, no. 9 (1910), p. 229.

William Bode. "More Spurious Pictures Abroad Than in America." New York Times (December 31, 1911), p. SM4.

Wilhelm R. Valentiner. The Art of the Low Countries. English ed. Garden City, N.Y., 1914, p. 205, ill.

"The Altman Collection in the Metropolitan Museum, New York." Art and Progress 6 (January 1915), p. 87.

François Monod. "La Galerie Altman au Metropolitan Museum de New-York (2e article)." Gazette des beaux-arts, 5th ser., 8 (November 1923), pp. 298–99, identifies the model as the Marchesa Lomellini-Durazzo, possibly the same model as in the portrait now in the Ettlinger Collection.

Handbook of the Benjamin Altman Collection. 2nd ed. New York, 1928, p. 38, no. 12.

Gustav Glück. Van Dyck, des Meisters Gemälde. 2nd ed. [1st ed. 1909]. Stuttgart, 1931, p. 541, ill. p. 208 [1st ed. by Emil Schaeffer, 1909, ill. p. 181].

Duveen Pictures in Public Collections of America. New York, 1941, unpaginated, no. 186, ill.

Josephine L. Allen and Elizabeth E. Gardner. A Concise Catalogue of the European Paintings in The Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York, 1954, p. 32.

Howard Hibbard. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York, 1980, p. 305, 309, 313, 329, fig. 548 (color).

Erik Larsen. L'opera completa di Van Dyck. Milan, 1980, vol. 1, p. 109, no. 338, ill. p. 110 and colorpl. 32, dates it between 1621 and 1625.

Walter A. Liedtke. Flemish Paintings in The Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York, 1984, vol. 1, pp. 54–56; vol. 2, pl. 25, suggests a date of about 1622–23, but notes that it may date to the mid-1620s; observes that it is strikingly anticipated in design and conception by Titian's "Empress Isabella" of 1548 (Prado, Madrid).

Walter A. Liedtke. "Anthony van Dyck." Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin 42 (Winter 1984/85), pp. 23–24, fig. 19 (color).

Walter A. Liedtke. "Flemish Paintings in the Metropolitan Museum—II: Van Dyck, Jordaens, Brouwer, and Others." Tableau 6 (February 15, 1984), pp. 29, 31, fig. 3.

Erik Larsen. The Paintings of Anthony van Dyck. Freren, Germany, 1988, vol. 1, p. 224; vol. 2, pp. 144–45, no. 354, ill.

Introduction by Walter A. Liedtke in Flemish Paintings in America: A Survey of Early Netherlandish and Flemish Paintings in the Public Collections of North America. Antwerp, 1992, pp. 24, 331, no. 206, ill.

Alfred Moir. Anthony van Dyck. New York, 1994, pp. 19, 23, fig. 37.

Katharine Baetjer. European Paintings in The Metropolitan Museum of Art by Artists Born Before 1865: A Summary Catalogue. New York, 1995, p. 286, ill., as "Portrait of a Woman, Called the Marchesa Durazzo".

Meryle Secrest. Duveen: A Life in Art. New York, 2004, p. 430.

Maria Grazia Bernardini in Anton van Dyck: Riflessi italiani. Ed. Maria Grazia Bernardini. Exh. cat., Palazzo Reale. Milan, 2004, p. 159, under no. 1.

Camillo Costa in Ottavio Costa (1554–1639): le sue case e i suoi quadri, ricerche d'archivio. Bordighera, Italy, 2004, pp. 89–90, fig. 26 (color), tentatively identifies the sitter as Luisa Costa, based on comparison with a portrait of Luisa by Jan Roos (Cassa di Risparmio di Genova e Imperia, Genoa).

Esmée Quodbach. "The Age of Rembrandt: Dutch Paintings in The Metropolitan Museum of Art." Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin 65 (Summer 2007), pp. 31–32, fig. 32 (Altman gallery photograph).

Xavier F. Salomon. "Review of Costa 2004." Burlington Magazine 150 (August 2008), p. 553, fig. 36, states that Costa's (2004) identification of the sitter as Luisa Costa is plausible and that the features of the women in the MMA and Genoa paintings are similar, but that the identity of the sitter in the Genoa painting requires firmer grounding.

Diana J. Kostyrko. The Journal of a Transatlantic Art Dealer: René Gimpel 1918–1939. London, 2017, p. 84 n. 35.

Notes

The sitter was identified by Bode (1900) as a member of the Durazzo family which, by the early seventeenth century, had long been known for its patronage of artists. The supposition that Van Dyck executed the picture in Genoa is supported by its style and by that of the lady's dress, and there seems little doubt that Van Dyck painted portraits of women in the Durazzo family. A family resemblance might be noted between the sitter in the Museum's picture and at least one of these women, the older lady said to be of the Durazzo family, in a portrait by Van Dyck in the Musée des Beaux-Arts, Strasbourg. The two portraits are also similar in composition and in the sitter's pose. Nonetheless, the identification of our sitter as a member of the Durazzo family must remain tentative.

Loan Restrictions

This work may not be lent, by terms of its acquisition by The Metropolitan Museum of Art.